How You Can Share Accomplishments Without Bragging

Here is a great follow-up to a recent article I posted about the benefits of tooting your own horn. I wrote about the why, and Ann has delved into the delivery. How you are perceived will depend largely on how you convey the information. Ann has a non-profit focus, but the principles apply broadly.

Ann Green's Nonprofit Blog

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We all know someone who talks too much about himself or brags about all the wonderful things she’s done.  Once this person gets going, it’s enough to make you want to flee the room.  Imagine your donors having the same reaction when all your communications sound like one big bragfest. You don’t want to be that guy

Of course, you want to share your accomplishments, and it’s possible do it without bragging. Here’s how.

Be donor-centered

You don’t need to tell your donors your organization is great. They wouldn’t have given you money if they didn’t think highly of you.

Let your donors know they’re great because they helped you make a difference for the people or community you serve. Give specific examples.  Because of donors like you, Rachel can sleep in her own bed tonight.

All your communications should be donor or audience-centered.  One way to ensure this…

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In search of the next 250

What a ride! I am now fully three quarters of the way to my target of 1,000 followers on Twitter, and I am happy to report that I am one step above ‘quietly confident’ that I will manage to reach my goal before the end of the year.

With that said, after all that I’ve learned with this experiment, from its humble beginnings, to my midpoint achievement, it seems a bit silly to strive for a specific number of followers on any social media platform. Let alone by a specific end date. Quality must trump quantity, right? Well, that remains to be seen. Continue reading In search of the next 250

Bad bloggers don’t die, they multiply!

As a reader, I have definite opinions about what makes a good blog great, and what makes a bad blog horrible. It’s not scientific by any stretch. It’s actually quite intuitive and visceral. It’s a deep, gut reaction from the moment the link turns purple. It has nothing to do with whether a blogger has a huge audience or not. It has everything to do with the quality of the content. This applies equally to personal and professional blogs.

Now, I’m relatively new to this blogging business, but even I, with my limited exposure and experience, have spotted some examples of absolutely atrocious posts that have to be called out. What’s so upsetting is that they have seemingly ignored some of the most basic blogging advice available. Far more established bloggers than me have addressed this topic, and yet, against all logic, these ‘writers’ continue to pollute my screen with their senseless syllables.

In no particular order, here are some of my biggest pet peeves: Continue reading Bad bloggers don’t die, they multiply!